Nutrients, Calories, Benefits of White Mushroom, Raw

Published on: 01/06/2022

Calories in White Mushroom, Raw


White Mushroom, Raw contains 22 kCal calories per 100g serving. The reference value of daily consumption of White Mushroom, Raw for adults is 22 kCal.

The following foods have approximately equal amount of calories:
  • Beans, canned, liquid-free contents (20kCal)
  • Beans, canned, without salt, contents without liquid (20kCal)
  • Beans, green, canned, liquid-free contents (21kCal)
  • Beans, green, canned, without salt, contents without liquid (22kCal)
  • Beans (23kCal)
  • Pinto beans (variegated), ripe sprouted seeds, boiled, with salt (20kCal)
  • Pinto beans (variegated), mature sprouted seeds, boiled, without salt (22kCal)
  • Mash (mung beans), sprouted, boiled, without salt (21kCal)
  • Cow peas (Chinese cowpea), leaves, boiled, with salt (22kCal)
  • Cow peas (Chinese cowpea), leaves, boiled, without salt (22kCal)

Carbohydrates in White Mushroom, Raw


White Mushroom, Raw have 2.26 g of carbohydrate per 100g serving, which is 9% of the daily value. Carbohydrates are a key source of energy for muscles to help you fuel, perform and recover. Carbohydrates are also important for optimal physical and mental performance. The reference value of daily consumption of White Mushroom, Raw for adults is 2.26 g. 2.26 g of carbohydrates are equal to 9.04 kCal. A medium 5.3 oz skin-on potato contains 26 grams of carbohydrates. Many of today’s most popular fad diets recommend restricting all or specific carbohydrate-rich foods. This is unfortunate because carbohydrates have many important functions and eliminating them from the diet is neither necessary nor healthy.

Proteins in White Mushroom, Raw


White Mushroom, Raw contains 3.09 g proteins per 100g serving. A medium 5.3 oz skin on potato has 3 grams of protein. Protein is an important component of almost every cell and tissue in the body. Protein is made up of amino acids. There are 20 amino acids with biological significance; however, only nine are essential, meaning that our bodies cannot synthesize them and they must be obtained through food.

Fats in White Mushroom, Raw


White Mushroom, Raw contains 0.34 g fats per 100g serving. 0.34 g of fats are equal to 2.72 calories (kCal).

Vitamins and other nutrients in White Mushroom, Raw

Nutrient Content Reference
Calories 22kCal 22kCal
Proteins 3.09g 3g
Fats 0.34g 0g
Carbohydrates 2.26g 2g
Dietary fiber 1g 1g
Water 92.45g 92g
Ash 0.85g 1g
Vitamin B1, thiamine 0.081mg 0mg
Vitamin B2, riboflavin 0.402mg 0mg
Vitamin B4, choline 17.3mg 17mg
Vitamin B5, pantothenic 1.497mg 1mg
Vitamin B6, pyridoxine 0.104mg 0mg
Vitamin B9, folate 17mcg 17mcg
Vitamin B12, cobalamin 0.04mcg 0mcg
Vitamin C, ascorbic 2.1mg 2mg
Vitamin D, calciferol 0.2mcg 0mcg
Vitamin D2, ergocalciferol 0.2mcg 0mcg
Vitamin E, alpha tocopherol, TE 0.01mg 0mg
beta Tocopherol 0.01mg 0mg
gamma Tocopherol 0.01mg 0mg
tocopherol delta 0.01mg 0mg
Vitamin PP, NE 3.607mg 4mg
Betaine 9.4mg 9mg
Potassium, K 318mg 318mg
Calcium, Ca 3mg 3mg
Magnesium, Mg 9mg 9mg
Sodium, Na 5mg 5mg
Sera, S 30.9mg 31mg
Phosphorus, P 86mg 86mg
Iron, Fe 0.5mg 1mg
Manganese, Mn 0.047mg 0mg
Copper, Cu 318mcg 318mcg
Selenium, Se 9.3mcg 9mcg
Zinc, Zn 0.52mg 1mg
Mono- and disaccharides (sugars) 1.98g 2g
Glucose (dextrose) 1.48g 1g
Fructose 0.17g 0g
Arginine 0.078g 0g
Valin 0.232g 0g
Histidine 0.057g 0g
Isoleucine 0.076g 0g
Leucine 0.12g 0g
Lysine 0.107g 0g
Methionine 0.031g 0g
Threonine 0.107g 0g
Tryptophan 0.035g 0g
Phenylalanine 0.085g 0g
Alanine 0.199g 0g
Aspartic acid 0.195g 0g
Glycine 0.092g 0g
Glutamic acid 0.343g 0g
Proline 0.076g 0g
Serine 0.094g 0g
Tyrosine 0.044g 0g
Cysteine 0.012g 0g
Campesterol 2mg 2mg
Saturated fatty acids 0.05g 0g
16: 0 Palmitic 0.04g 0g
18: 0 Stearin 0.01g 0g
Polyunsaturated fatty acids 0.16g 0g
18: 2 Linoleum 0.16g 0g
Omega-6 fatty acids 0.16g 0g

Nutrition Facts About White Mushroom, Raw

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