Correct Carbohydrates For Women: List Of Products, Daily Allowance For Weight Loss

Marko Balašević Author: Marko Balašević Time for reading: ~19 minutes Last Updated: September 12, 2022
Correct Carbohydrates For Women: List Of Products, Daily Allowance For Weight Loss

Most girls are afraid of carbohydrates and strive to completely eliminate them from the diet. But is it justified? How carbohydrates affect our weight, and how much of them is safe for the figure. Today we will analyze the topic of carbohydrates for women: the daily intake, the intake for weight loss, what their excess and deficiency lead to, and which carbohydrates should be chosen.

 

Daily carb intake for women and how to calculate it

Most girls are afraid of carbohydrates and strive to completely eliminate them from the diet. But is it justified? How carbohydrates affect our weight, and how much of them is safe for the figure. Today we will analyze the topic of carbohydrates for women: the daily intake, the intake for weight loss, what their excess and deficiency lead to, and which carbohydrates should be chosen.

Carbohydrates are not only very tasty, they are also useful if you do not go overboard with their quantity and choose quality sources. All carbohydrates contained in food are different and affect the body in different ways.

Carbohydrates act as a source of energy for cells. When you eat carbohydrate foods, carbohydrates are broken down into smaller compounds, such as glucose, and provide fuel for your body's cells. Excess carbohydrates are stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles. When the body does not get enough carbohydrates from food, it turns to these glycogen stores.

Certain types of carbohydrates also play a key role in digestion, heart health, and brain function. In some cases, the body is able to convert other nutrients, such as proteins or fats, into glucose to perform certain functions. In other cases, a lack of certain types, such as fiber, can affect everything from cholesterol levels to bowel function. In addition, carbohydrates are needed for metabolism, muscle function and the nervous system. Therefore, you cannot independently exclude carbohydrates from the diet - you need to do this only according to indications and under the supervision of a specialist.

 

Excessive consumption of carbohydrates paired with low energy consumption leads to weight gain. Therefore, it is believed that an excess of carbohydrates in the diet leads to obesity, metabolic disorders, high cholesterol and the development of diabetes.

The required daily intake of carbohydrates for a woman depends on many factors:

  • age;

  • health status;

  • goals;

  • level of physical activity;

  • individual preferences.

Therefore, it will not be correct to display one general figure for all women. For example, Masha, who works in an office and has insulin resistance, and Marina, a fitness trainer with workouts every day, will have completely different carbohydrate needs. One leads a sedentary lifestyle and already has health problems, while the other moves a lot and needs a lot of energy. Even if they are the same age and pursue the same goals, their daily carbohydrate intake will be radically different.

 

To sum it up: the amount of carbohydrates depends on the level of physical activity, lifestyle and health in general. And, of course, the daily intake of carbohydrates depends primarily on the goal of a woman: maintenance, weight gain or weight loss. Depending on the initial state of the woman and her goals for health and figure, a decision is made about how many carbohydrates she needs.

The norm, excess or lack of carbohydrates in the female body

There are some general numbers that you can focus on, but you should not take them as the only true ones. According to the American Dietary Guidelines, carbohydrates should make up 45 to 65 percent of your daily calorie intake. We remind you that this is only a general figure for a conditionally healthy person without taking into account his goals and characteristics.

It is believed that to maintain body weight, it is enough to consume 2-5 g of carbohydrates per day per 1 kg of body weight. When gaining muscle mass, this number is increased, and when losing weight, it is reduced.

 

For weight loss, women often use low-carb diets, which, according to research, do work. Reducing carbs can often help you lose weight without counting calories by simply limiting your carb sources.

In order to lose weight, the amount of carbohydrates is reduced to 50-150 grams per day. This can have both its advantages and disadvantages.

Research shows that low-carbohydrate diets can be part of an effective weight loss strategy. They limit carbohydrate intake while replacing them with proteins, healthy fats, and vegetables. They are believed to help reduce a person's appetite (through quality sources of fat in the diet) and cause them to eat fewer calories than other diets.

Study: The Effects of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet on Appetite: A Randomized Controlled Trial

It is worth noting that in addition to weight loss, low-carbohydrate diets have other benefits. They can help lower blood sugar, blood pressure, and triglycerides, as well as raise HDL (good) cholesterol and improve the structure of LDL (bad) cholesterol.

Study: Health Effects of Low-Carbohydrate Diets: Where Should New Research Go, Effects of Low-Carbohydrate Diets Versus Low-Fat Diets on Metabolic Risk Factors: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials

How many carbs does a woman need to lose weight

As we said, the optimal amount of dietary carbohydrates varies for each person. Many experts recommend consuming 15-30% of total calories as carbohydrates. For most women, this is usually 75-150 grams per day, although increases or decreases may be recommended on a case-by-case basis.

For some women, it is better not to resort to extremely low carbohydrate values, but to consume a moderate amount of carbohydrates, about 100-150 grams. in a day.

This applies to women who:

  • lead an active lifestyle and need to recover after training;

  • have thyroid problems

  • have amenorrhea or irregular cycles;

  • have been on a highly low-carbohydrate diet for an extended period of time;

  • are pregnant or breastfeeding.

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In these cases, moderate carbohydrate diets will provide the following benefits:

  • weight loss;

  • improved mood and energy levels;

  • normal menstrual function;

  • sleep improvement.

For some women, such as athletes or those who wish to gain muscle mass, a carbohydrate intake of more than 150 grams will be more appropriate.

For some women, a lower carbohydrate intake is recommended, but under the supervision of a specialist.

This applies to women who:

  • Are overweight or obese.

  • They lead a sedentary lifestyle.

  • Have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), fibroids, or endometriosis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1334192/

  • They have IR. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15767618/

  • Diabetes type 1 or 2 was diagnosed.

  • Have a neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer's or Parkinson's). https://www.nature.com/articles/ejcn2013116

  • Have certain forms of cancer.

 

Female hormones are sensitive to energy availability, meaning that too few calories or carbohydrates can cause an imbalance. This imbalance can have very serious consequences, including impaired fertility, bad mood, and even weight gain.

However, most evidence suggests that these effects tend to occur only in women on a long-term, very low-carbohydrate diet (less than 50 grams per day).

Each person is different, and optimal carbohydrate intake varies greatly between individuals. There is no one solution that fits all. Some people do best on a very low carb diet, while others function best on a moderate to high carb diet.

To find out what amount of carbs works best for you, try experimenting and adjust your carb intake based on how you feel, how much energy you have, and how you look.

What happens in the female body when carbohydrates are given up. No carbohydrate diet. Carbohydrates and female hormones.

But, despite the fact that low-carb diets have their advantages, it is necessary to consider the impact of reducing carbohydrates on the female body.

Low carb diets can be good for some people and cause problems for others. For example, long-term adherence to a low-carbohydrate diet can lead to hormonal imbalance in some women.

 

The dangers of low-carb diets for women.

  1. carbohydrates and hormones.

    Hormones are regulated by three main glands:

    • Hypothalamus: Located in the brain.

    • Pituitary gland: located in the brain.

    • Adrenal glands: located at the top of the kidneys.

    All three glands interact in complex ways to keep hormones in balance. This is the so-called hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis.

    It is responsible for regulating stress levels, mood, emotions, digestion, immune system, sex drive, metabolism, energy levels. The glands are sensitive to things like calorie intake, stress, and exercise levels.

    Prolonged stress can lead to an overproduction of the hormones cortisol and norepinephrine, creating an imbalance that increases pressure on the hypothalamus, pituitary, and adrenal glands. This continued pressure can eventually lead to axis dysfunction.

    Study: The role of stress and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome: neuro-endocrine and target tissue-related causes, Diurnal variation of adrenocortical activity in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Symptoms:

    • fatigue;

    • weakened immune system;

    • increased risk of long-term health problems: hypothyroidism, inflammation, diabetes, etc.

    Many sources suggest that a diet too low in calories or carbohydrates can also act as a stressor, causing HPA axis dysfunction. In addition, some evidence suggests that low-carbohydrate diets can cause increased production of cortisol (“stress hormone”), exacerbating the problem. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22735432/

    For example, one study found that, regardless of weight loss, a low-carb diet increased cortisol levels compared to a moderate-fat, low-carb diet. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17785367/

    To recap: Eating too few carbohydrates or calories in general, coupled with chronic stress, can disrupt the HPA axis, causing hormonal problems.

     

  2. Carbohydrates and cycle.

    With prolonged thoughtless exclusion of carbohydrates, problems with the cycle or amenorrhea may occur.

    Amenorrhea is defined as the absence of a menstrual cycle in a woman for 3 months or more. The most common cause of amenorrhea is hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    The reasons:

    • too few calories

    • too few carbohydrates;

    • sudden weight loss;

    • stress;

    • too much physical activity.

    Amenorrhea occurs due to a drop in the level of hormones that trigger the menstrual cycle. This leads to a domino effect causing other hormones such as luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estrogen, progesterone and testosterone to drop. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12519869/

     

    Low levels of leptin, a hormone produced by fat cells, is another potential cause of amenorrhea and irregular periods. Evidence suggests that women need certain levels of leptin to maintain normal menstrual function. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17851226/

     

    Too few carbohydrates or calories in the diet can lead to suppression of leptin levels and impair leptin's ability to regulate reproductive hormones. This is especially critical for underweight or lean women on a low-carbohydrate diet.

    However, it should be noted that data on amenorrhea on low carbohydrate diets is not yet sufficient. Studies that have reported amenorrhea as a side effect have usually been done on women following a predominantly low-carbohydrate diet for an extended period of time. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22004525/

    A study of 20 teenage girls following a ketogenic diet for 6 months found that 45% experienced menstrual problems and 6 experienced amenorrhea. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12790900/

    Conclusion: Using a highly low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet for an extended period of time may cause irregular menstrual cycles or amenorrhea.

     

  3. Carbohydrates and the thyroid gland.

    The thyroid gland produces two hormones: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).

    These two hormones are essential for a wide range of bodily functions:

    • breath;

    • heart rate;

    • nervous system;

    • body mass;

    • temperature control;

    • cholesterol level;

    • menstrual cycle.

    T3, the active thyroid hormone, is highly sensitive to calorie and carbohydrate intake. If caloric or carbohydrate intake is too low, T3 levels fall and reverse T3 (rT3) levels rise.

    Study: Diurnal variation of adrenocortical activity in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Reverse (reverse) T3 is a hormone that blocks the action of T3. Some studies have shown that ketogenic diets lower T3 levels. For example, one study showed that T3 levels decreased by 47% within 2 weeks in people consuming a carbohydrate-free diet. In contrast, people consuming the same calories but at least 50 grams of carbs daily experienced no change in T3 levels.

    Study: Effect of caloric restriction and dietary composition of serum T3 and reverse T3 in man

    Low T3 and high reverse T3 can slow down metabolism, leading to weight gain, fatigue, lack of concentration, and a bad mood.

    One study found that 1 year of a moderate carbohydrate diet (46% of total energy intake) had a more positive effect on mood than a long-term very low carbohydrate diet (4% of total energy intake) in overweight adults and obesity.

    Study: Long-term effects of a very low-carbohydrate diet and a low-fat diet on mood and cognitive function

    Conclusion: Reducing carbs too much can lead to decreased thyroid function in some people. This can manifest itself as fatigue, weight gain and a bad mood.

     

How to determine the amount of carbohydrates in foods

Tables or various calorie counters will help determine the amount of carbohydrates in foods. But, it is very important to focus not only on the numbers, but also on the quality of these carbohydrates. So, calories from a cake and calories from chickpeas are completely different calories that will affect the body in different ways. Therefore, it is always better to direct your attention to the products themselves, and not to dry numbers. Tables with the content of carbohydrates can serve as a guide and help you make the right choice when planning your diet.

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Foods high in carbohydrates:

Name

Amount of carbohydrates

Candy lollipop (caramel)

95.8 g

Bee honey

80.3 g

rice flour

80.2 g

Paste

80 g

Zephyr

79.8 g

Marmalade chewing

79.4 g

Custard gingerbread

75 g

sugar cookies

74.4 g

sugar cookies

74.4 g

Strawberry jam

74 g

Rice groats

74 g

Corn flour

72.1 g

Drying simple

71.2 g

Corn grits

71 g

Semolina

70.6 g

Buckwheat flour

70.6 g

Premium flour pasta

70.5 g

Raspberry jam

70.4 g

Premium wheat flour

69.9 g

Dates

69.2 g

Wheat groats

68.5 g

Butter cookies

68.5 g

Butter cookies

68.5 g

Pasta from 1 grade flour

68.4 g

Wheat flour 1 grade

67.8 g

Pearl barley

66.9 g

Cream crackers

66.7 g

Millet groats (polished)

66.5 g

Seeded rye flour

66.3 g

Oat bran

66.2 g

Raisin

65.8 g

Barley groats

65.4 g

oat flour

64.9 g

Oat flour (oatmeal)

64.9 g

Wheat flour 2 grades

64.8 g

Biscuit cake with protein cream

63.1 g

dried pear

62.6 g

waffles

62.5 g

Rice (grain)

62.3 g

Peeled rye flour

61.8 g

Oat flakes "Hercules"

61.8 g

Whole wheat flour

61.5 g

Buckwheat (prodel)

60.4 g

oatmeal

59.5 g

Wheat (grain, soft variety)

59.5 g

Chocolate candies

59.2 g

Dried apples

59 g

Rye flour

58.5 g

Dried figs

57.9 g

dried peach

57.7 g

Wheat (grain, durum)

57.5 g

Prunes

57.5 g

Buckwheat (kernel)

57.1 g

Non-fat condensed milk with sugar

56.8 g

Barley (grain)

56.4 g

Buckwheat (grain)

56 g

Rye (grain)

55.8 g

Butter buns

55.5 g

Condensed milk with sugar 8.5%

55.5 g

Condensed milk with sugar 5%

55.2 g

Oats (grain)

55.1 g

Sunflower halva

54 g

Dried acorns

53.6 g

Dried apricots

53 g

Milk powder non-fat

52.6 g

Shortcake with cream

52.1 g

Sliced ​​loaf

51.4 g

Dried apricots

51 g

milk chocolate

50.4 g

Carbohydrate content in cereals, grain products and legumes:

Peas (shelled)

48.1 g

Green peas (fresh)

8.3 g

Buckwheat (grain)

56 g

Rice casserole

19.4 g

Cottage cheese and rice casserole

26.1 g

Green peas (canned)

6.5 g

Buckwheat porridge (from unground groats)

14.6 g

Oatmeal porridge Hercules

14.8 g

Semolina porridge

16.4 g

oatmeal porridge

15.5 g

Barley porridge

22.9 g

Wheat porridge

25.7 g

Millet porridge

16.8 g

Rice porridge

25.8 g

barley porridge

15.3 g

Semolina cutlets

20.2 g

Bran Crackers

63.2 g

Buckwheat (prodel)

60.4 g

Buckwheat (kernel)

57.1 g

Corn grits

71 g

Semolina

70.6 g

oatmeal

59.5 g

Pearl barley

66.9 g

Wheat groats

68.5 g

Millet groats (polished)

66.5 g

Rice groats

74 g

Barley groats

65.4 g

Canned corn

11.2 g

sweet corn

19 g

Homemade noodles

60.1 g

Pasta from 1 grade flour

68.4 g

Premium flour pasta

70.5 g

Boiled pasta

20 g

Egg pasta

69.6 g

Mash

46 g

Buckwheat flour

70.6 g

Corn flour

72.1 g

oat flour

64.9 g

Wheat flour 1 grade

67.8 g

Wheat flour 2 grades

64.8 g

Premium wheat flour

69.9 g

Whole wheat flour

61.5 g

Peeled rye flour

61.8 g

Rye flour

58.5 g

Seeded rye flour

66.3 g

rice flour

80.2 g

chickpeas

46.1 g

Oats (grain)

55.1 g

List of foods with the right carbohydrates

Not all carbohydrates are created equal. There are many different types of carbohydrate-containing foods, and they can vary in their health effects. Carbohydrates are usually divided into “simple” and “complex” or “whole” and “refined”. Let's figure out which of them are more correct.

Whole carbs are unprocessed and contain fiber, while refined carbs go through processing and natural fiber removal.

Examples of Whole Good Carbohydrates:

  • vegetables;

  • quinoa;

  • barley;

  • legumes;

  • potato;

  • whole grains.

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Refined carbohydrates:

  • sugar-sweetened drinks;

  • White bread;

  • bakery products;

  • other products made from white flour.

Numerous studies show that consumption of refined carbohydrates is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Study: Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, Carbohydrates, and Type 2 Diabetes, Dietary carbohydrates, refined grains, glycemic load, and risk of coronary heart disease in Chinese adults

Refined carbohydrates tend to cause increased hunger and unhealthy food cravings. In addition, they are poor in nutrients - these are "empty" calories.

However, do not demonize all carbohydrate-containing foods. Whole carb sources are loaded with nutrients and fiber and don't cause spikes or dips in sugar levels. Numerous studies on high-fiber carbohydrates, including vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains, show that eating them is associated with improved metabolic health and a reduced risk of disease.

Study: Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality—a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies, The Effects of Legumes on Metabolic Features, Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Function Tests in Women with Central Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Instead of thinking of carbohydrates as "good" or "bad", focus on increasing your whole and complex sources of carbohydrates.

List of correct carbohydrates:

  • Vegetables. Try to add a variety of carbohydrate sources from vegetables to your diet every day.

  • Whole fruits: apples, bananas, kiwis, oranges, grapefruits.

  • Berries: blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, currants.

  • Legumes: lentils, beans, peas.

  • Nuts: almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, macadamia.

  • Seeds: Chia seeds, pumpkin and hemp seeds.

  • Whole grains: quinoa, brown rice, buckwheat.

 

Sources of carbohydrates that should be limited or eliminated whenever possible:

  • Sugary drinks: carbonated drinks, fruit juices with added sugar, and all drinks sweetened with high fructose syrups.

  • White bread. These are refined carbohydrates that are low in essential nutrients and negatively affect metabolism.

  • Baking, cookies and cakes.

  • Ice cream.

  • Sweets and chocolates. If you still choose chocolate, let it be quality dark chocolate.

  • French fries and potato chips.

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List of healthy carbohydrates:

    1. Quinoa

      Cooked quinoa contains 21.3% carbs, making it a high carbohydrate food, but it is also a good source of protein and fiber. Quinoa is rich in many minerals and plant compounds. It is gluten-free and is a popular alternative to wheat for those on a gluten-free diet.

      Study: Dietary animal and plant proteins intake and their associations with obesity and cardio-metabolic indicators in European adolescents: the HELENA cross-sectional study, In vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glucose response of gluten-free foods and their gluten counterparts

       

    2. Buckwheat

      Raw buckwheat contains 71.5% carbohydrates, while boiled buckwheat contains about 20% carbohydrates. It is highly nutritious as it contains protein, fiber, and high amounts of minerals and antioxidants. In addition, it may be beneficial for heart health and blood sugar control, especially in people with diabetes.

      Study: Comparison of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and hyperglycaemia between buckwheat seed-consuming and non-consuming Mongolian-Chinese populations in Inner Mongolia, China, Oats and buckwheat intakes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in an ethnic minority of China

       

    3. Bananas

      Bananas are one of the most popular fruits in the world. They consist of approximately 23% carbohydrates in the form of starches or sugars. Bananas are rich in potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. They also contain several beneficial plant compounds. Unripe bananas contain resistant starch and pectin, which support a healthy digestive system and nourish friendly gut bacteria.

      Study: Potassium intake, stroke, and cardiovascular disease a meta-analysis of prospective studies, Digestion of the carbohydrates of banana (Musa paradisiaca sapientum) in the human small intestine

       

    4. Sweet potato

      Delicious and nutritious tuber - contains 18-21% carbohydrates. This carbohydrate content consists of starch, sugar and fiber. Sweet potatoes are a rich source of provitamin A (from beta-carotene), vitamin C, and potassium.

       

    5. Beet

      Raw and cooked beets contain about 8-10% carbohydrates, mostly from sugar and fiber, plus vitamins, minerals, powerful antioxidants, and plant compounds. Beets are also rich in inorganic nitrates, which are converted to nitric oxide in the body. Nitric oxide lowers blood pressure and may reduce the risk of several diseases. Beetroot juice is very rich in inorganic nitrates and is often used to improve physical performance during endurance exercise.

       

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  1. oranges

    They are mostly water and contain 11.8% carbohydrates. Oranges are also a good source of fiber, especially rich in vitamin C, potassium, and some B vitamins. In addition, they contain citric acid, as well as several very powerful plant compounds and antioxidants. Helps increase the absorption of iron from food, reducing the risk of anemia.

     

  2. Blueberry

    It can be called a superfood due to the high amount of plant compounds and antioxidants. It is high in many vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, vitamin K, and manganese. Studies show that blueberries protect the body from oxidative damage and may improve memory in older adults.

    Study: Cellular antioxidant activity of common fruits, Effect of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink intervention on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial function in humans with cardiovascular risk factors

     

The list of healthy carbohydrates is actually very long! Just choose the ones you like and do not forget to follow the quantity.

Carbohydrates are good, they are our friends and energy providers. In order for them to work for us, and not against us, it is necessary to choose quality sources and control portion sizes. Swap refined carbs for whole carbs, don't overeat, and add healthy fats to every meal to get the most out of carbs without harming your health.

The material is based on research:
  • The Effects of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet on Appetite: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Health Effects of Low-Carbohydrate Diets: Where Should New Research Go

  • Effects of Low-Carbohydrate Diets Versus Low-Fat Diets on Metabolic Risk Factors: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials

  • The role of stress and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome: neuro-endocrine and target tissue-related causes

  • Diurnal variation of adrenocortical activity in chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Diurnal variation of adrenocortical activity in chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Effect of caloric restriction and dietary composition of serum T3 and reverse T3 in man

  • Long-term effects of a very low-carbohydrate diet and a low-fat diet on mood and cognitive function

  • Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, Carbohydrates, and Type 2 Diabetes

  • Dietary carbohydrates, refined grains, glycemic load, and risk of coronary heart disease in Chinese adults

  • Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality—a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies

  • The Effects of Legumes on Metabolic Features, Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Function Tests in Women with Central Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

  • Dietary animal and plant protein intakes and their associations with obesity and cardio-metabolic indicators in European adolescents: the HELENA cross-sectional study

  • In vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glucose response of gluten-free foods and their gluten counterparts

  • Comparison of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and hyperglycaemia between buckwheat seed-consuming and non-consuming Mongolian-Chinese populations in Inner Mongolia, China

  • Oats and buckwheat intakes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in an ethnic minority of China

  • Potassium intake, stroke, and cardiovascular disease a meta-analysis of prospective studies

  • Digestion of the carbohydrates of banana (Musa paradisiaca sapientum) in the human small intestine

  • Cellular antioxidant activity of common fruits

  • Effect of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink intervention on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial function in humans with cardiovascular risk factors

 

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